L.I. Antique Power Association

P.O. Box 1134 Riverhead L.I. N.Y. 11901
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September 2009
September 09
I found the following bit of prose in an old magazine.

I thought you might enjoy it.

How many summers had she spent in the filed turning the soil and making it yield food for the life of man?

How many hot days had she rolled in the sun and sat in the rain, never complaining, never fretting, never thinking of her ultimate gain.

And now she sits in a junkyard after rolling thousands of miles adding worth to the life of man, now surrounded with discarded wire and cans and tanks and galvanized pieces of junk and wheels and tires and part of the machines not even buried, with no tombstone above her radiator that said that she had been faithful and performed her task, that she had done her duty to the very last.

And now she sits, the wind and the rain and the snow little by little take from her being as chips of rust fall to the ground.

She is no good. She has no purpose left within her pistons. She has no motive to roll another inch.

But there was a time, there was a day when she was beautiful. Her color was brilliant, her tires were full of air, her tank was filled with fuel and the smoke that came from her stack said that she was alive and pulling a heavy load, but complaining not.

And so it is with the things of man. He uses them as long as he can and when they are useless to provide him no more he drives them out to a pasture, a field, or a junkyard where nothing will adore.

Is such the lot of man who was a conception pleasure, at birth pain, who in childhood a toy, who in youthful years brings mixed blessing and anguish, who in adulthood produces, provides and protects and when he is older, past the productive point, past the age of providing and protecting, he is put out in a junkyard to decay, to be made to feel that he has nothing to contribute except fertilizer that might escape from a heavy vault buried in a wooden box under six feet of clay?

Written 4/27/79 – by David Purvis

Remember this is your news letter, so if there is anything you would like to see printed, please do not hesitate. Let me know what is going on. Have you been on a trip? Did you add to your collection? Did you celebrate with anyone? Is there someone we should be thinking about? Do you have something for sale? Are you looking to buy something? Just let me know and I'll make sure it gets into the newsletter.

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